Indigenous approaches at play in creating positive student outcomes in a tertiary institution

MCFALL-MCCAFFERY, Judy Taligalu and COOK, Stephanie (2016) Indigenous approaches at play in creating positive student outcomes in a tertiary institution. Paper presented at: IFLA WLIC 2016 – Columbus, OH – Connections. Collaboration. Community in Session 168 - Indigenous Matters.

Bookmark or cite this item: http://library.ifla.org/id/eprint/1535
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Language: English (Original)
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Abstract

Indigenous approaches at play in creating positive student outcomes in a tertiary institution

This paper demonstrates how the weaving of indigenous Pacific research, pedagogical approaches and methodologies can be effectively employed by Pacific peoples in a blended learning tertiary environment to both promote and modify academic and information literacy skills (AIL). AIL skills are part of the key attributes of the University of Auckland Graduate Profile which the University believes students require to succeed in academia. The use of Pacific indigenous methodologies like Teu le va/Tauhi va (Samoan/Tongan relationships), Tālanoa (Pacific discussion formal and informal) and the Kakala framework (Tongan pedagogy) in working with students and staff build on existing knowledge, experience and values of many students. The approach adopted has also contributed to a change in academic staff and student perceptions of AIL as ‘library’ only skills in a Pacific Studies undergraduate programme at the University. The application of an expanded “culturally and linguistically sustaining” (Paris, 2012) integrated approach in our study is producing research based positive outcomes such as: increased academic staff support for AIL integration; increase in student participation and engagement in Libraries and Learning Services workshops and First Year Students Targeted Learning Sessions. The close collaboration va/relationships and tālanoa with staff and students help address areas for further collective development, such as scaffolding and expanding research skills into the next level courses and better transparency of research skills in course assessment. This paper will be of interest to institutions with growing Pacific and other minority populations, seeking to assist students achieve positive academic outcomes.

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